EU’s secretive anti-piracy talks cause concern

EU Observer
07.12.2009
By TERESA KÜCHLER

EUOBSERVER / BRUSSELS - EU officials are working on a global intellectual property treaty which could rewrite national legislation on copyright but which is being put together in a secretive process which helps to “launder” policies that may be too unpopular to pass through normal democratic channels.

The EU and industrialised countries such as the US, Canada, Australia and Japan have since last spring been negotiating a trade pact known as Acta - the Anti-Counterfeit Trade Agreement.

The treaty has been presented first and foremost as a way of tackling physical forgeries, such as designer handbags or or pirated DVDs. But leaks reveal that it will also have a much broader scope, including the sensitive issue of intellectual copyright on the internet.

A document from the latest round of Acta talks, held in South Korea last month, reveals that the US is pushing for a global version of the so-called “three strikes law” - a measure by which people who illegally download music or films receive warnings but ultimately face having their internet cut off and going to jail.

The leaked text, a three-page European Commission memo written by an unnamed official, purports to summarise a private briefing given by US trade officials.

“The US wants Acta to force ISPs [Internet Service Providers] to put in place policies to deter unauthorized storage and transmission of IP [Intellectual Property] infringing content (for example clauses in customers’ contracts allowing a graduated response),” it says. The term “graduated response” is jargon for the three strikes law.

France recently passed a three-strikes bill, with the UK, Spain and the Netherlands reportedly working on their own versions. But the controversial legislation is highly unpopular, with some critics saying access to information on the internet is a basic human right.

The Acta talks are taking place outside all existing multilateral treaty-making bodies such as the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), the UN or the WTO. They are also taking place in extreme secrecy,‭ ‬making it impossible for elected politicians, media or the public to get access to official documents.

Meanwhile, the exclusivity of the Acta talks means that countries such as China, India and Russia, which are major targets of any new IP legislation and which have a say in the WTO or WIPO but not in Acta, will be presented with a fait accompli down the line.

“Acta continues its career as the most shocking circumvention of democratic governance in the already long history of copyright and patent regulation,” Jeremie Zimmerman from the France-based internet freedom pressure group, La Quadrature du Net, has said.

“The interest groups and fundamentalists of property on information, culture and knowledge are trying to find hidden paths, such as multilateral agreements, for co-operating governments to push forward their agendas in complete secrecy.”

Some of the most eye-popping blog and press reports claim that under Acta customs officials could end up going through travellers mp3 players and laptops to look for pirate files or that ISPs will be forced to spy on their customers.

With negotiators gagged by the procedure, it is impossible to say which rumours are false or true - a problem noted by European politicians.

“International trade agreements are always ‘take it or leave it’ deals for national assemblies to decide upon, and this deal will in the end need approval from national parliaments or the European Parliament.”

According to the diplomatic contact, about half of the 27 EU states believe that increased Acta transparency, such as a publicly-availabe document to point to, would boost public confidence.

The diplomat added that “EU officials simply cannot give into any demands from their US peers that go beyond national or community laws existing in EU countries, like for instance the American request for a global ‘three strikes and you’re out’- principle.”

“The commission’s negotiators do not have the mandate for that,” he said.

Full article

Related:

What do you know about the EU “Stockholm Programme”? *

Corner shop worker told to stop singing in her store - or pay for a performing licence

Anger at record industry bosses over school anti-piracy lessons for children as young as five

Eircom to block internet access to Pirate Bay as other firms refuse

Mandelson demands officials to draw up draconian internet laws after meeting media billionaire

Children’s Charities Speak Out Against Australian Government Internet Censorship

City wants all passwords - State access to public’s online communications - Mom fined $1.9m for 24 songs

Herald: Banned hyperlinks could cost you $11,000 a day

The Guardian: Keep The Web Free - Govt ID Card To Get Online?

BBC: EU Will Conduct Remote Searches On Your PC *

Garda chief asks mobile phone firm to retain web-browsing data *

PNAC Revisited: The Future of Warfare *

Unknown Music Crimes 2008 - what does it mean for you & me? *

End of Nations - EU Takeover and the Lisbon Treaty